Earth Overshoot Day

Earth Overshoot Day is a date to establish the day when the demand for earth’s resources exceeds the planets capacity to regenerate. Earth Overshoot Day is hosted and calculated by Global Footprint Network.

Protecting The Earth

To determine the date of Earth Overshoot Day for every year, Global Footprint Network calculates the quantity of days of that year that Earth’s biocapacity suffices to produce for humanity’s Ecological Footprint. the rest of the year corresponds to international overshoot. The idea was first proposed by Andrew Simms.

The equation has four main factors:

How much we have a tendency to consume

How expeditiously product are created

How many people there are

How much nature’s ecosystems are able to turn out.

It’s basically a quantification of the quantity of natural resources, suppose trees, fish and water, humanity takes from the world reaches the entire that may be regenerated over the whole year. It’s once the quantity of carbon emitted reaches the quantity the forests and oceans are able to absorb.

In 2017, it happened in seven months, as per the Global Footprint Network. Humanity was at break-even in 1971 and even had a surplus before that. Since then, the date has been gradually shifting earlier which basically means that we as humans are exacting additional from the world whereas reducing its capability to regenerate.

According to their calculations, we’re exploitation the resources of 1.7 planets once a year.

To rein in our ecological disbursal, we’d got to push Earth Overshoot Day back 4.5 days every year to be living at intervals our single-planet suggests that by 2050.

The Global Footprint Network calculates every year’s overshoot day.

(Planet’s Biocapacity / Humanity’s Ecological Footprint) x 365 = Earth Overshoot Day)

New political economy Foundation partnered with Global Footprint Network in 2006 to launch the primary international Earth Overshoot Day campaign. WWF has also since become a partner. At that time, Earth Overshoot Day used to fall in October.

In 2017, the world Overshoot Day fell on August 2.

Read more here.

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